How to: put together a regular-strength Cheeseboard

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    How to make a regular cheeseboard Easy Food

    In our humble opinion, it’s just not Christmas without a good cheeseboard! Since everyone has different taste, we’ve put together serving suggestions for three different strengths of cheeseboard, as well as a cheesy showstopper!

    So, with a cheeseboard for all and for all a good bite, here we go with the Easy Food regular cheeseboard!

    Shropshire blue

    This mellow blue has an unusual orange colour due to the addition of annatto, a natural food colouring, making it a visually striking addition to a cheeseboard. Its unmistakable sharp blue flavour is nicely balanced by a smooth, creamy mouthfeel.

    Killeen goat

    This is a classic Dutch-style gouda cheese made in County Galway, made using goat’s milk in place of the more usual cow’s. Younger cheeses have a fresh, milky flavour, while more aged versions develop fruity and nutty notes.

    Morbier

    At first glance, this looks like a blue cheese. However, the vein running horizontally through the centre is actually vegetable ash, once used to preserve cheese made from the morning’s milk throughout the day so that the evening’s yield could be added. Morbier has a strong aroma but a relatively mild, creamy flavour.

    Note – this cheese contains unpasteurised milk and is not recommended for consumption during pregnancy.

    Little Milk Co. Vintage Cheddar

    Made and aged in the authentic Cheddar style, this is a stark contrast to most “Cheddar” found on supermarket shelves. Hard and crumbly, it has a deep nutty flavour with delicious pockets of salt crystals scattered throughout. While the flavour is intense, that doesn’t stop this from being a great crowd-pleaser to add to your board.

    Note – this cheese contains unpasteurised milk and is not recommended for consumption during pregnancy.

    Chaource

    This washed rind cheese has a mild aroma of mushrooms and a creamy, slightly acidic flavour. More mature versions have an interesting contrast of textures, as the centre of the cheese remains stiff and creamy, while the paste under the rind becomes gorgeously gooey.

    Note – certain variations this cheese contains unpasteurised milk and is not recommended for consumption during pregnancy.

    For more tips on assembling a cheeseboard, click here!